Whatever happened to international humanitarian law? ~ Yemen’s Humanitarian Appeals Fall on Deaf Ears

Yemen’s Humanitarian Appeals Fall on Deaf Ears

yemenchild

TEHRAN (FNA)– Yemen is overwhelmed by a spreading humanitarian disaster and relief organizations remain unable to resolve the major crisis point.

Because of the criminal blockade by the House of Saud and its cohorts, the country is overwhelmed and international assistance – if any – often arrives too little and is too late, that’s according to Oxfam, which warns lack of funding and shrinking access are compromising its ability to meet humanitarian needs.

The United Nations considers four emergencies as severe and large scale: Central African Republic, Iraq, Syria and South Sudan. This is while the criminal war and blockade have also left 20 million Yemeni people vulnerable to malnutrition, illness, violence, and death, and in need of aid and protection.

The main problem is that the warmongers do not allow direct international aid into the country from places like Iran. But that’s not all. The current humanitarian system is led by the United Nations, funded largely by a handful of rich countries, and managed mostly by those actors. And we all know how these actors are also behind the current atrocities against the poorest country in the Middle East.

Obviously, they have no intention to save lives. They also impede the capacity of local actors such as Iran to prevent, prepare and respond to the ongoing crisis, which can have a high rate of return in saving lives and preventing damage to communities and infrastructure.

Under international law, the United Nations must address the pressing humanitarian efforts and force other member states to follow suit by making mandatory assistance to the humanitarian appeals.

As is, demand for humanitarian aid in Yemen has risen dramatically amid an uptick in water scarcity, food insecurity, demographic shifts, infrastructure demolition and blockade. All these and other dynamics are contributing to a situation in which current resources are insufficient to meet the rising demand for aid.

Oxfam says two out of three Yemenis needed humanitarian assistance before the current crisis, and the UN appeal is only 20 percent funded! One way to address the problem of assistance being too little and arriving too late is to invest more in “direct humanitarian action” led by local actors. Experience shows it is often faster and more appropriate, and can even save more lives.

Yemen’s Humanitarian Appeals Fall on Deaf Ears

Iran did just that, but to no avail. It seems the warmongers have submitted different recommendations to the UN secretary-general, which are not designed to meet the rising demand for aid in the war-torn country. Whatever happened to international humanitarian law?

SOURCE

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