Lytton Strachey: After the battle, who shall say that the corpses were the most unfortunate?

Antiwar literary and philosophical selections

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Anti-war essays, poems, short stories and literary excerpts

Robert Graves: Men at arms and men of letters, the birth of English pacifism in the First World War

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66483-004-75978184

Lytton Strachey
From Eminent Victorians (1918)
Florence Nightingale

Miss Nightingale arrived at Scutari – a suburb of Constantinople, on the Asiatic side of the Bosphorus – on November 4th, 1854; it was ten days after the battle of Balaclava, and the day before the battle of Inkerman. The organisation of the hospitals, which had already given way under the stress of the battle of the Alma, was now to be subjected to the further pressure which these two desperate and bloody engagements implied. Great detachments of wounded were already beginning to pour in. The men, after receiving such summary treatment as could be given them at the smaller hospitals in the Crimea itself, were forthwith shipped in batches of two…

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